Languages

We offer Chinese, French, Japanese, Korean  Latin and Te Reo Maori from year 9 to Year 13 at Logan Park, with long distance learning available New Zealand wide in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and possible other languages if appropriate for an individual student. When studying a language there is a focus on communication, language knowledge, and cultural knowledge. These aspects are dealt with holistically at Logan Park and are integrated into the teaching and learning programmes.

Students will develop the skills to speak, present, read, write, listen to and respond to the language(s) they have chosen. Year 9 starts with understanding and using familiar expressions and everyday language. By the time students have reached Year 13, students will have reached the stage of personal independence in the language they are studying, being able to take part in general conversations, explain and discuss many of their own ideas, and use language creatively. They will be able to act in a culturally appropriate way in most social situations involving native speakers.

Logan Park student Ava Straw says: “Learning another language not only opens your mind but also opens another world”. Ava is currently in Year 13 and won the Alliance Française Year 12 national prize of a trip to New Caledonia last year. She can also speak Italian and Chinese.


Teacher Contact

Name

Role

email

Barbara Fitzsimons

HoD Languages

bmf@lphs.school.nz

Maeve Lonie

 

mml@lphs.school.nz

Wei Mao

 

wei@lphs.school.nz

Tipene Winiata

 

thw@lphs.school.nz 

Sue Kim

 

snk@lphs.school.nz


Chinese

Mandarin Chinese is taught from Years 9 to 13 following the NZ Learning Languages curriculum area.  

JUNIOR CLASSES (YEARS 9 - 10)

In Years 9 and 10 students will
  • Learn how to recognise pinyin, the official phonetic system for Mandarin pronunciation.
  • Learn to speak and write in Chinese
  • Learn about 50 topics in two years of study, including greetings, numbers, asking information, seeing a doctor, and many more.
  • Learn study skills and how to use internet resources to learn Chinese
  • Get to know the longest continuous culture/civilization in the world 
  • Learn Chinese paper-cutting, calligraphy (optional)

SENIOR CLASSES (YEARS 11 – 13)

In Years 11-13 students will
  • Work towards NCEA Levels 1 – 3
  • Work on personalized, individual programmes based on your level of Chinese
  • Use skills for intermediate/ upper intermediate listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Chinese
  • Translate between Chinese and English
  • Read and analyse a variety of Chinese literary texts and views of writers of the Chinese world 
  • Use linguistic and cultural knowledge to understand Chinese fiction and non-fiction text
  • Learn Chinese paper-cutting, calligraphy, and Chinese painting (optional)

LINKS TO  COURSE OUTLINES 

TEACHER CONTACT

Wei Mao Chinese wei@lphs.school.nz

French

”Les limites de ma langue sont les bornes de mon monde”
The limits of my language are the limits of my world

French is taught from a communicative approach with listening, speaking, reading and writing skills interwoven with culture. There are a variety of teaching and learning methods including using Internet video clips and podcasts of native speakers, individual computer applications for vocabulary and grammar, pair and group work for speaking and conversation, a variety of text types for reading and promoting writing skills and recording conversations with digital cameras. French is learned using relevant  topics or themes  which move from the immediate world of the student ( year 9) , to survival French for travel (years 10 and 11) to near fluency or fluency, in a wide variety of contexts both concrete and abstract, (years 12 and 13).  Structures, vocabulary and grammar are covered according to themes and student level.

Year 9

At year 9 students achieve understanding and use of familiar expressions and everyday vocabulary. They begin the year by interacting orally in a supported way, then during the year progress to understanding and constructing simple texts using their knowledge of French.  They learn to describe aspects of their own back ground and immediate environment. Proficiency Descriptor - NZ curriculum Levels 1 -3(4)

Year 10

At this level students continue to develop understanding and use of familiar expressions and everyday vocabulary, and understanding and constructing simple texts using their knowledge of French.  They continue to develop the ability to describe aspects of their own back ground and immediate environment.  They communicate beyond the immediate context e.g. past and future which links to the LPHS foci of “Past” and “Future”.

Year 11

This course encourages effective communication in listening and responding, speaking and presenting, interacting, viewing/reading and writing.  In Year 11 the language, vocabulary, structures and themes studied in Year 9 and Year 10 are revised and extended and the following new themes are studied: Travel situations,  A typical day at home,  Holidays,  Communication,  Health,  One’s country

By the end of Year 11 students are working at Level 6 of the National Curriculum and present for assessment in 24 credits of NCEA Level One.                                         

Year 11 students develop communication beyond the immediate context of their lives e.g. about past and future events.  They learn to understand and produce a variety of text types, using a variety of tenses, structures and vocabulary, developing beyond language survival skills towards social competence.

NCEA Level One French

The FIVE NCEA Achievement Standards offer credits in the general skill areas of listening and responding, speaking and interacting, reading/viewing and responding and writing: 24 credits in total. There are THREE internal standards: Speak/Present, Interact and Write, totalling 14credits and TWO external standards; Listen and Respond, View and Respond, assessed in an end-of-year examination totalling 10 credits.

Year 12 & 13 French

This course encourages effective communication in listening and responding, speaking and presenting, interacting, viewing/reading and writing.  In Years 12 and 13 the language, vocabulary, structures and themes studied in Years 9 - 11 are revised and extended in a variety of media and text types including video clips, podcasts, film, conversation/ interviews and written/literary texts. There is a focus over years12 and 13 on the following themes: Year A: Les Ados,  Le Monde Internationale, Les régions de la France and Education/Boulot.  Year B: La vie quotidienne, l’avenir, l’outre-mer and la culture/l’éducation. 

By the end of Year 12 students have completed working at Level 7 of the National Curriculum and present for assessment in 24 credits of NCEA Level Two.  By the end of Level 7 students will be developing personal independence in French, able to take part in general conversations with French speakers, understand some of what is said, and contribute relevant comments.  They can explain and discuss many of their own ideas and use language creatively.  During the year they  read a variety of authentic material and write expressively for a range of purposes. They use a range of language-learning strategies effectively and by the end of the year they can generally able to act in a culturally appropriate way in most social situations involving native speakers.

NCEA French Level 2 & 3 credits

The FIVE NCEA Achievement Standards offer credits in the general skill areas of listening and responding, speaking and interacting, reading/viewing and responding and writing: 24 credits in total. There are THREE internal standards: Speak/Present, Interact and Write, totalling 14credits and TWO external standards; Listen and Respond, View and Respond, assessed in an end-of-year examination totalling 10 credits.

By the end of Year 13 students have completed working at Level 8 of the National Curriculum and present for assessment in 24 credits of NCEA Level Three.   By the end of Year 13 they have completed Level 8 of the New Zealand curriculum and have reached the stage of personal independence in French.  They are able to take part in general conversations with French speakers, understand much of what is said, and contribute relevant comments.  They can explain and discuss many of their own ideas and use language creatively.  During the year they read a variety of authentic material and write expressively for a range of purposes. They use a range of language-learning strategies effectively and by the end of the year they can act in a culturally appropriate way in most social situations involving native speakers.

Course Outlines

2017 French Level 1
2017 French Level 2
2017 French Level 3
 

Teacher Contact

Barbara Fitzsimons

 French

bmf@lphs.school.nz


Latin

Junior Classes (Years 9 - 10)

  • Discover you already speak over 100 Latin words
  • Find out that Latin helps you with English and other languages
  • The Grammar programme is based on the Oxford Latin Course
  • Learn to speak and write in Latin
  • Learn about Roman and Greek history, culture and mythology

 Senior Classes (Years 11 – 13)

  • Work towards NCEA Levels 1 – 3
  • Include many international students
  • Work on personalized, individual programmes based on your level of Latin
  • Extend grammatical knowledge into more complex structures
  • Translate Latin text into English
  • Read and analyse a variety of Latin literary texts and views of writers of the Roman world
  • Use linguistic and cultural knowledge to understand Latin literary text

Course Outlines

2017 Latin Level 1
2017 Latin Level 2
2017 Latin Level 3

 

Teacher Contact

Maeve Lonie

 Latin

mml@lphs.school.nz


Te Reo Maori

Te Reo is taught holistically and communicatively, with listening, speaking, reading and writing interwoven with tikanga/cultural philosophy and practices).  It is taught with topics which relate to the world of the student and Te Ao Māori (the Māori world). Structures, vocabulary and grammar are covered according to themes and student level. Significant seasonal events/kapa haka/marae visits will be incorporated into the programme in the context of the calendar and other events outside the school.

Year 9

At this level students begin the year by learning to greet and respond, introduce themselves and interact orally with well-rehearsed sentence patterns and familiar vocabulary, in predictable exchanges.  They progress to reading and writing straight-forward versions of what they have learned to say. They become aware of and understand some of the typical cultural conventions/tikanga that operate in interpersonal communication. They become aware of the processes involved in learning Te Reo Māori.  They learn to describe aspects of their own background and immediate environment.   

Year 10

At this level students are further developing their ability to cope with understanding and use of familiar expressions and everyday vocabulary. They can use familiar language with some flexibility and pick up some new language from its context.  They can read and write a variety of simple text types using their knowledge of Te reo Māori.  They continue to develop the ability to describe aspects of their own background and immediate environment.  They start to communicate beyond the immediate context e.g. past and future. By the end of this year they can cope with a variety of routine situations when talking to speakers of Te reo Māori.   They develop further awareness and understanding of typical cultural conventions/ tikanga that operate in interpersonal communication. They can use and respond to language including directions and requests, that is likely to occur in familiar Māori. They are becoming more confident in using a range of language learning strategies.

Year 11

By the end of this year students can converse with Te reo Māori speakers in familiar social situations and cope with some less familiar ones. They can use basic Māori language patterns spontaneously. They show a willingness to experiment with new language and to read independently. They can write short passages, personal letters, and simple formal letters in te reo Māori.   Students are increasingly confident in using a range of strategies for learning te reo Māori and for communicating with others in predominantly Māori social contexts.

Year 11 assessments will be 24 – 30 credits of the NCEA Level One assessment standards

Years 12 and 13

At present these courses are offered through distance learning.

Course Outlines

2017 Maori Level 1

Teacher Contact

Tip Winiata

 Maori

thw@lphs.school.nz

 


Korean

2017 Korean Level 1
2017 Korean Level 2
2017 Korean Level 3

Teacher Contact

Sue Kim Korean snk@lphs.school.nz